Looking for a new mount to make that iPad or new Android tablet accessible for someone to use while in a wheelchair, bed, or table?  Here are some mounts that just might do the trick.  These are new to our IPAT Equipment Loan Library and available for rent by going to the IPAT AT4All website or by calling 1-800-895-4728. Stay Tuned for Part 2 Next Month!

Latitude Mounting Arm

The Mount and Our Experience

This mount has metal construction with a 20″ range, super clamp mount, and several mounting plate options.  We chose the universal mounting plate system to go with ours, as we have all versions of the iPad, mini iPad, as well as, many Android tablets.  Ablenet also sells iDevice mounting plates and cradles for particular mobile devices that are compatible with this Latitude Mount.

In our experience this mount was very sturdy and could withstand significant pressure on the mobile device while attached.   The mount itself was easy to set up; however, the Universal Mounting (UM) plates required some reading.  Each plate (Circle, Triangle and Rectangle) had to be attached to a middle circular plate, which either popped into place or was attached by fasteners.  Once attached, the plate appeared strong.

Latitude Mount measurements
Latitude Mount measurements

Wishes

  • Solid mounting plates, with no separate middle piece.  Having to share one middle piece with all 3 connectors is difficult once you have put Dual Lock or Velcro on the mounting plate.  This would be helpful in schools, centers, and other facilities when using it for evaluation purposes.
  • Option to purchase a little longer top/lower arm pieces.  This would allow for more mounting positions.

 

Modular Hose AT Mounting Systems

The Mount and Our Experience

This low-cost mounting system consists of strong plastic pieces (loc-line) that snap together either with your hands or a special assembly pliers, allowing it to be made into many different lengths and configurations.  The hose snaps on to either spring clamp(s) or a universal clamp to mount on tables, wheelchairs, and walkers.  The company makes a variety of plates, trays, and tablet holders for mounting many devices. We purchased the #100001 AT Starter Kit with a Tablet Holder.

The strength of this mount is better than a gooseneck, but still not made for strong pushes as it will move away from the user.  We recommend it for someone who will be interacting with a mounted device with a lighter touch or using it with switch scanning.

The company provides several videos that explain how to put together the loc-line.  I had to watch these videos of  before I learned how to use the assembly pliers correctly to snap the main hose together.  Once I learned how, it was pretty easy. The end pieces that snap on to the clamps and the plates, however,  have to be attached by hand and that is where it gets tricky if you have weak hands like I do. The video makes it look extremely easy, but if you have arthritis or just aren’t that strong, you may have to get a buddy to help you or start a hand strengthening program.  I have been told by my colleagues who have used in more than I that it is all about the angle, and assembly becomes easier with experience.

On the plus side, you get a lot of mounting options in the kits to mount many devices at once, so it can be ideal for schools or institutions with small budgets.  In addition, there are several smaller mounting options already assembled.  that Therese Willkomm of the AT program at the University of New Hampshire provides a nice short video on many uses of one particular modular hose set up.

Wishes

  • We would like to see an easier way to attach the loc-line to the clamps and plates.

New iPad and Mobile Device Mounts Available for Rent from IPAT: Part 2

New iPad and Mobile Device Mounts Available for Rent from IPAT: Part 3

About Author

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Jeannie Krull is the Program Director for ND Assistive (formerly IPAT). She is an ASHA certified speech/language pathologist and a RESNA certified Assistive Technology Professional, who has worked with people with disabilities of all ages since 1991.